UPTHRUST PARK IN SIMO

  • Stacks Image 128

    Caption Text

    Link
  • Stacks Image 129

    Caption Text

    Link
  • Stacks Image 130

    Caption Text

    Link
  • Stacks Image 159

    Caption Text

    Link
  • Stacks Image 169

    Caption Text

    Link
Stacks Image 202

LAND REBOUND
Land rebound, which is a result of glacier weight being removed, still continues now after 10,000 years. The extent of land rebound varies in different parts of the country, being at its strongest in the Bothnian Bay shoreline area. Here the land rises about 8.5 mm per year. Land rebound is most evident on the shores, where new land is exposed.

When the ice melted, the continental plate started to straighten. Though Finland has not seen glaciers in 8,000 years, the continental plate still continues to straighten. The straightening process is slow, and might still continue for thousands of years. It is estimated that in the Gulf of Bothnia the land will rise another 80–120 metres, which would take another 7,000–12,000 years. This probably means that the Gulf of Bothnia will become a chain of lakes, connecting the northern rivers of Finland and Sweden, which flow into the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean through the Baltic Sea.

Land rebound is measured with a GPS method, where the location and height of the measuring station is defined using several satellites. The measuring place is no longer bound to the seashore, but can also be located inland. The GPS method has been tested in the Nordic BIFROST project. Measurements covering just a few years give an exact picture of the land rebound.
Stacks Image 205

Merestä kokonneen maan valtaa erilaiset rannikon pioneerikasvit muodostaen rantaniittyjä. Myöhemmin rannan valtaa pensaat ja puut. Tyypillisesti ensin ehtivät paju, raita, leppä ja koivu ennen kuusta ja mäntyä.